Busy year!

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I’m a part of the coaching staff for Upper Echelon Fitness.

At Upper Echelon Fitness I work with my associates to provide the highest quality coaching possible. I provide individual training plans to meet individual needs and to help riders meet their cycling and fitness goals. I believe it is important to develop a rider in ways that not only increase their performance on the bike, check but which also translate into a healthier lifestyle.  In addition to improving physical and mental fitness, seek I feel many riders can benefit from learning more about their in race decision making as well, more info providing in depth race strategy and tactics however possible. It is my goal to develop riders in all areas, so that a rider may discover their true potential as an athlete. I love watching the people I work with accomplish their goals.  I strive to provide the highest quality coaching and to provide as much support as possible for my riders.

I am also a Licensed Massage Therapist.  I focus on therapeutic deep tissue and structural integration as it pertains to injury recovery, sports performance and general health improvement through body work.  I love being able to make a difference in peoples lives for the better!  Working with my clients to recover from injuries, removing daily aches and pains and improving their health and comfort in their lives is one of most fulfilling aspects of my career and life!

In addition to individual coaching plans and massage therapy, I instruct several Classes at Upper Echelon through the year, ranging from indoor cross training, trainer classes, and skills classes.  In the summers, I do a race and bike handling skills course on Monday nights before the Monday night PIR race begins.  Fall, winters and early spring I typically hold indoor/outdoor training sessions which complement a riders training goals if they are looking to gain speed in the summer for racing or nice weather group rides and fun rides.  I am also available for presentations for teams or groups covering topics such as race tactics, training methods and plan design, bike fitting basics or goal setting around athletic performance.

For more information about coaching and other services we provide at Upper Echelon, make sure to visit our site!
Of all the tricks of the trade for recovery and sports performance increases, link
one of the most effective available is massage therapy.  I first discovered this as I was starting to really train and race on a national level.  With logging of thousands of miles and putting my legs to the test against pelotons full of professional racers, I began to turn to massage as a way to repair my legs and body after the intense training and racing I was putting it through, and  found incredible results from the addition of bodywork!

This discovery was what had turned me onto the idea of becoming a massage therapist.  Today I am happy to say that I am able to pass on the improved recovery and healing aspects to others that have so greatly helped me in the past.  But there is still a bit of a science in fine tuning when and where to add massage into your diet if you are an athlete, and the type of body work you receive will depend on your training and racing schedule some what.

Being an athlete, I would say there are basically 3 styles of massages that you will most likely be looking for from your session and there is an optimal time to receive each style:

1) A pre event tune up massage – this is one that is going to be somewhere between 48hrs to the day off your event.  The goal in this session is to generally relax tight muscles, boost blood flow and take away any pre-event nervousness or tension.   A couple of days before your big event is not the time for some major deep tissue massage work, extensive myofascial work, or anything else that is likely to have a big lasting effects on you.  This is for several reasons – it can take a couple of days for muscles to recover from a bodywork session, in terms of athletic performance, you may experience a decrease in peak performance during this time, just as you would if you did a very hard workout the day before a big event.  Deep bodywork is a great tool for a body recovering from injuries and training with athletes, but is best used a little further out from a big event or workout.  Make sure your massage is on the lighter side in terms of pressure and be sure that your therapist is aware of your upcoming event.

2) Recovery massage – this is typically done after an event.  Massage is a great tool to increase the bodies ability to recover from hard efforts.  Many teams and athletes will get massages in between stages of stage races, or after a big event(such as a marathon).  The session here should be similar to a pre event massage, with the main goals of the session to improve blood flow to the muscle and also emphasizing on relaxation.  It is typically ok to have a little deeper work right after an event than right before, so allowing your therapist to work deeper in this session is encouraged.

3) Deep tissue/focused work/injury recovery – Using a massage to really work out tension and adhesions in muscles from training, and recovering from injuries is a great way to improve performance.  The best time jump into more in depth work is after a hard block of training or racing, but during a rest week.  If it is not a rest week, be sure you keep fairly relaxed the rest of the day while keeping to an easier workout on the following day, allowing the bodywork to soak in and allow your body to get used to any new improved ranges of motion, body structures, posture or movement patterns.  Having more time spent in a superior physical state of being is important in its habit settings-allowing yourself to hold yourself in a better state for more time will more successfully build the long term habit of being in that position.  It is also important to let your muscles have some time to recover from the bodywork.  You may feel great after the session, but deep and intense work may leave a muscle group in a similar state as it is after a hard workout, so give it a chance to really recover from the session, and your body will thank you generously by maintaining a more comfortable superior state of being and improved athletic performance!

Hopefully this helps in determining the timing of your bodywork session if you are actively training and racing.  If you have any questions, comments or wish to schedule a therapeutic massage, please contact me!

 
Of all the tricks of the trade for recovery and sports performance increases, cystitis
one of the most effective available is massage therapy.  I first discovered this as I was starting to really train and race on a national level.  With logging of thousands of miles and putting my legs to the test against pelotons full of professional racers, somnology
I began to turn to massage as a way to repair my legs and body after the intense training and racing I was putting it through, cure
and  found incredible results from the addition of bodywork!

This discovery was what had turned me onto the idea of becoming a massage therapist.  Today I am happy to say that I am able to pass on the improved recovery and healing aspects to others that have so greatly helped me in the past.  But there is still a bit of a science in fine tuning when and where to add massage into your diet if you are an athlete, and the type of body work you receive will depend on your training and racing schedule some what.

Being an athlete, I would say there are basically 3 styles of massages that you will most likely be looking for from your session and there is an optimal time to receive each style:

1) A pre event tune up massage – this is one that is going to be somewhere between 48hrs to the day off your event.  The goal in this session is to generally relax tight muscles, boost blood flow and take away any pre-event nervousness or tension.   A couple of days before your big event is not the time for some major deep tissue massage work, extensive myofascial work, or anything else that is likely to have a big lasting effects on you.  This is for several reasons – it can take a couple of days for muscles to recover from a bodywork session, in terms of athletic performance, you may experience a decrease in peak performance during this time, just as you would if you did a very hard workout the day before a big event.  Deep bodywork is a great tool for a body recovering from injuries and training with athletes, but is best used a little further out from a big event or workout.  Make sure your massage is on the lighter side in terms of pressure and be sure that your therapist is aware of your upcoming event.

2) Recovery massage – this is typically done after an event.  Massage is a great tool to increase the bodies ability to recover from hard efforts.  Many teams and athletes will get massages in between stages of stage races, or after a big event(such as a marathon).  The session here should be similar to a pre event massage, with the main goals of the session to improve blood flow to the muscle and also emphasizing on relaxation.  It is typically ok to have a little deeper work right after an event than right before, so allowing your therapist to work deeper in this session is encouraged.

3) Deep tissue/focused work/injury recovery – Using a massage to really work out tension and adhesions in muscles from training, and recovering from injuries is a great way to improve performance.  The best time jump into more in depth work is after a hard block of training or racing, but during a rest week.  If it is not a rest week, be sure you keep fairly relaxed the rest of the day while keeping to an easier workout on the following day, allowing the bodywork to soak in and allow your body to get used to any new improved ranges of motion, body structures, posture or movement patterns.  Having more time spent in a superior physical state of being is important in its habit settings-allowing yourself to hold yourself in a better state for more time will more successfully build the long term habit of being in that position.  It is also important to let your muscles have some time to recover from the bodywork.  You may feel great after the session, but deep and intense work may leave a muscle group in a similar state as it is after a hard workout, so give it a chance to really recover from the session, and your body will thank you generously by maintaining a more comfortable superior state of being and improved athletic performance!

Hopefully this helps in determining the timing of your bodywork session if you are actively training and racing.  If you have any questions or comments, or wish to schedule a therapeutic massage, please contact me!

 
Massage therapy is a great tool for athletes looking to recover from training, and
injuries and bodies that are generally achy and tired from their active lifestyles.  Not only is it great for athletes looking for the extra sharp edge in their performance, ampoule
anyone suffering from stress, visit this
tension, car accidents, repetitive movements, poor body mechanics(how are you sitting right now?) and many other issues.

I am a licensed Massage Therapist (LMT #18718) with the main focus on working with athletes, repetitive use injuries, injury recovery(such as strained/torn muscles, car accidents, bike race crashes) and those just generally looking to feel better.  My bodywork sessions are a blend of deep tissue, structural integration and swedish(relaxation) massage techniques, aimed at working with your body to recover, reduce tension and improve the function of your body.

60min – 75$

90min- 95$

package deals

3 sessions – 210

6 sessions – 400$

Please arrive on time for your appointment, as I schedule so you receive a full 60min or 90min of bodywork.  Contact me today to schedule!

 

 
My what a busy year!

I can hardly believe its been 2 weeks since I last put up a post.  So with so much going on keeping my busy, this
I thought it would be relevant to highlight some of the fun things I am putting on that have been keeping me so busy.

First off – Indoor cycling season is here!  I am offering a couple of indoor trainer classes at Upper Echelon.  In the past it has just been 2 a week, but demand is high this year, so it has been 2 nights a week with 2 classes.  I have classes at 5:30pm and also at 7pm, on both Tuesday and Thursday.  Each class is one hour and is focused around building fitness needed to go race on the road this year.  If you are just looking for a good workout, and no intentions to race, these classes will ensure you have some good legs when the weather gets nice and you want to hit your favorite summer routes!

To sign up for classes, head to the Upper Echelon Classes page right here.

I have also been organizing a couple of events for new riders as well.

The first one is indoors going over the basics of knowledge a person will want to know if they are getting into racing.  It includes categories, race age, OBRA rules, registration and other important knowledge a new racer will want to be aware of.  More info can be found here.

The second one is outside at Alpenrose Dairy, this one is focused around on the bike skills a person will want to have to safely navigate in a group of riders as well as general bike handling drills to improve a riders overall skills and competency on their bike.  This is beneficial to racers and non racers alike, the more skilled you are on your bike, the less likely you are to crash in a sketchy situation.  For this clinic, you can find out more info here.

Both of the clinics are free for anyone to attend.  If you are thinking of getting into racing, are still figuring out the ropes and new to it, or have a friend who might be interested, send them to the clinic and they will pick up a ton of useful information!

If you have any further questions on the clinics or the indoor cycling classes I am leading, please contact me and I am happy to get you squared away!

New Years Goal setting!

While it is a little bit cliche  to sit down and look over your goals on new years eve, visit it does make sense to double check your 2013 race goals at this time if you are an athlete looking at the new years calendar.  Most of us have some time now to prepare for our events and its a good time to start looking at the calendar to really settle into training for your goal event.  At any rate, check cliche or not, pulmonologist its better to to have an annual event to sit down and double check your goals whether they are bike racing, or just general life goals, than tramp along through your training not really knowing what you are doing with it.

There is the classic goal setting rule of when looking at goals to make sure they fit into the “smart” category.  What smart stands for is Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic & Time based. I can think of about 4 different classes through high school or collage that has talked about it, but the more I coach people and assist in their goal making process, the more I realize how important each of these different components become in setting good goals.

For example, if you just say “I want to be the best bike racer in Oregon”. thats really not very specific, it is really hard to measure, nor is there a timeline.  Realistic – maybe, but again, it comes down to can it be measured and how do you measure such a thing (even the BARR has its flaws in truly finding who is the best of the best).  But, lets change that to saying “It is my goal to win the 35+ masters category at crit championships in 2013” we are now hitting all of the “smart” aspects of goal setting with a specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time based.

After meeting these basic parameters, its time to look at the next set of tools needed in effective goal setting and completion.

Keep your language positive

How you speak of the goals can make a big difference.  You want to be sure that you are speaking in terms that lock them into your current self.  You also want to use words that lock them into creating a bit of fire under your butt to make them happen.  You should use words like “I am..” rather than “I will…”. “I am” is going to set you on your path much more, it creates a present tense of action, as opposed to “I will” which is much more fleeting and does not bring it into the present.  Other words you want to avoid are “ould”s as in “Should”, “would”, “could”.   It is important to not use words such as, “not”, “can’t” “don’t” when you are talking or thinking about your goals.  We are looking to create success in your goals, in no way do those words create anything.  You want language that reinforces your habits to make positive direction in your goals, its the first step to achieving them.

Avoid “want” in goal setting
Do not use “I want to….” in goal setting.  There is wanting something and there is doing something about what you want.  Goal setting is about the doing portion of this. “I am going to…”  “It is my goal to….” These are much better ways of stating your intentions with goal setting.  Try it yourself, just say your goals in terms of “want” and then again terms of “my goal is…” or “I am going to…”  Do you feel a difference in saying them?  We say we “want” things all the time, so in goal setting, just stating you want something is not very binding.  But the difference between wanting something and having something is doing something.  Make sure your goals are defined in ways that are bridging the gap between wanting and having, that is the purpose of the goal in the first place.  Use this in your overall goal setting language, and expand it to other words as well.  Set your goals in words that you will hold yourself accountable to and words that have you initiate the actions needed to achieve them.

Write it down!
It may sound simple, but write your goals down!  Once you come up with a good goal you want to work for, write it down.  Just setting it in paper, inscribed in with your own hands and movement does a world of wonder for bringing it closer to you.  It makes it that much more real that you are doing it.  If you just talk about it, it disappears as soon as you stop talking about it thinking about it.  Write it down, make it real and make it a constant in your training, life and mind.

Now, at this point, go ahead and write down your goals for the year.  Think of where you would like to see the greatest improvements in your fitness or results using the above strategies.

Determine the factors that go into achieving your goal and make small goals as benchmarks!

Now it is time to start looking into how you will achieve your goal and what steps are needed to do so.  Let say your goal is:

“It is my goal to win the 35+ masters category at crit championships in August of 2013”

Now we have a clear cut goal that we can easily focus on, its time to start further setting smaller goals that are steps in the process in order to achieve this goal.  This is when you start to look at what your limiters are in achieving the goal at hand, and what you need to focus on to improve them.  This is also when a discussion with your coach typically begins, as the next goals become the building blocks of your training plan.  This is also when it is important to take some time to review past power files, personal bests, weaknesses, race files and any other data that will help you and your coach determine what your biggest limiters are for achieving your goal.  Lets say you have good data from last years races, including power files from races, training rides and field tests done with your power meter.  Using these, we will get the greatest idea of what to focus on.

Lets look at a couple of possible smaller goals that go into meeting your main goal and methods for measuring them:

  • Increase threshold by 5% by July 20th – Measured with threshold testing either in the lab or field tests.
  • Reduce braking in corners – being a successful crit racer is as much about technique in the race as it is fitness.  Improvements here can be evident in speed changes while looking at race files, excessive power bursts out of corners in races(Especially if you can compare your files to another racer in the same field with similar physique and fitness).  The less you brake before the corner the less you sprint after the corner!
  • Improve sprinting mechanics – factors include cadence, power, speed, torque(which are evident in power files), and also largely technique.  Sprinting technique is most evident to another person watching you, your coach can be a great eye in evaluating and making sprinting technique suggestions and also show you in your power files how the improvements in technique are improving in your speed and power!)

Now, at this point, you will continue to make smaller and smaller goals that continue to support one another and also become more and more specific to what you need for making improvements.  The more you break down the goal into smaller goals and tasks to complete, the more bench marks you have along the way to keep you on track.  Following this process develops goals that become more and more personal to your needs and become the ground work for a solid training plan.

Hopefully at this point, you are able to see how making goals is very important step in achieving success in your training, and really shapes how training is to follow.  I hope that this is has been helpful to you in setting your goals for the new year!   For questions or comments, feel free to contact me!