October training, what do I do now that the warmth is leaving?

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I’m a part of the coaching staff for Upper Echelon Fitness.

At Upper Echelon Fitness I work with my associates to provide the highest quality coaching possible. I provide individual training plans to meet individual needs and to help riders meet their cycling and fitness goals. I believe it is important to develop a rider in ways that not only increase their performance on the bike, ailment but which also translate into a healthier lifestyle.  In addition to improving physical and mental fitness, visit this I feel many riders can benefit from learning more about their in race decision making as well, orthopedist providing in depth race strategy and tactics however possible. It is my goal to develop riders in all areas, so that a rider may discover their true potential as an athlete. I love watching the people I work with accomplish their goals.  I strive to provide the highest quality coaching and to provide as much support as possible for my riders.

In addition to individual coaching plans, I instruct several Classes at Upper Echelon through the year, ranging from indoor cross training, trainer classes, and skills classes.  In the summers, I do a race and bike handling skills course on Monday nights before the Monday night PIR race begins.  Fall, winters and early spring I typically hold indoor/outdoor training sessions which complement a riders training goals if they are looking to gain speed in the summer for racing or nice weather group rides and fun rides.  I am also available for presentations for teams or groups covering topics such as race tactics, training methods and plan design, bike fitting basics or goal setting around athletic performance.

For more information about coaching and other services we provide at Upper Echelon, make sure to visit our site!
Hard to believe it, recipe
but its already October, which means its time for indoor classes at Upper Echelon!  I am currently running my cross training and strength and conditioning classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30-6:30(We often run a few minutes over for stretching and recovery techniques, but people are free to leave, I know its often running into dinner time activities).

 

We do a range of training through the classes from running drills, agility drills, plyometrics, weights, stability drills, core and stretching.  I keep the program so it is building through the fall, so each class is a little different and continually changing to keep your body progressing and getting stronger while also keeping it interesting.  The training is based around fitness for cycling, focusing on building strength and power you need to ride hard through the season, while also addressing underused muscles and skills so you are more balanced and reduce chances for overuse injuries from sticking to one primary sport or activity through the year.

The training is great for both racers looking to keep fit and build an edge for their next race season, or just for people working for general fitness or cross training with no competition in sight.  The classes are structured in a way that you will be adequately challanged no matter what your level is.

 

Shoot me a message if you have any questions or sign up here:

 

 
Hard to believe it, this
but its already October, abortion
which means its time for indoor classes at Upper Echelon!  I am currently running my cross training and strength and conditioning classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30-6:30(We often run a few minutes over for stretching and recovery techniques, cialis 40mg
but people are free to leave, I know its often running into dinner time activities).

We do a range of training through the classes from running drills, agility drills, plyometrics, weights, stability drills, core and stretching.  I keep the program so it is building through the fall, so each class is a little different and continually changing to keep your body progressing and getting stronger while also keeping it interesting.  The training is based around fitness for cycling, focusing on building strength and power you need to ride hard through the season, while also addressing underused muscles and skills so you are more balanced and reduce chances for overuse injuries from sticking to one primary sport or activity through the year.

The training is great for both racers looking to keep fit and build an edge for their next race season, or just for people working for general fitness or cross training with no competition in sight.  The classes are structured in a way that you will be adequately challenged no matter what your level is.

Shoot me a message if you have any questions or sign up here:

http://www.upperechelonfitness.com/training/classes-and-clinics/

Hope to see you in class!

 
Hard to believe it, discount
but its already October, which means its time for indoor classes at Upper Echelon!  I am currently running my cross training and strength and conditioning classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30-6:30(We often run a few minutes over for stretching and recovery techniques, but people are free to leave, I know its often running into dinner time activities).

 

We do a range of training through the classes from running drills, agility drills, plyometrics, weights, stability drills, core and stretching.  I keep the program so it is building through the fall, so each class is a little different and continually changing to keep your body progressing and getting stronger while also keeping it interesting.  The training is based around fitness for cycling, focusing on building strength and power you need to ride hard through the season, while also addressing underused muscles and skills so you are more balanced and reduce chances for overuse injuries from sticking to one primary sport or activity through the year.

The training is great for both racers looking to keep fit and build an edge for their next race season, or just for people working for general fitness or cross training with no competition in sight.  The classes are structured in a way that you will be adequately challenged no matter what your level is.

 

Shoot me a message if you have any questions or sign up here:

http://www.upperechelonfitness.com/training/classes-and-clinics/

Hope to see you in class!

 
Hard to believe it, tadalafil but its already October, viagra 100mg
which means its time for indoor classes at Upper Echelon!  I am currently running my cross training and strength and conditioning classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30-6:30(We often run a few minutes over for stretching and recovery techniques, order
but people are free to leave, I know its often running into dinner time activities).

We do a range of training through the classes from running drills, agility drills, plyometrics, weights, stability drills, core and stretching.  I keep the program so it is building through the fall, so each class is a little different and continually changing to keep your body progressing and getting stronger while also keeping it interesting.  The training is based around fitness for cycling, focusing on building strength and power you need to ride hard through the season, while also addressing underused muscles and skills so you are more balanced and reduce chances for overuse injuries from sticking to one primary sport or activity through the year.

The training is great for both racers looking to keep fit and build an edge for their next race season, or just for people working for general fitness or cross training with no competition in sight.  The classes are structured in a way that you will be adequately challenged no matter what your level is.

 

Shoot me a message if you have any questions or sign up here:

http://www.upperechelonfitness.com/training/classes-and-clinics/

Hope to see you in class!

 
Massage therapy is a great tool for athletes looking to recover from training, medications
injuries and for anyone that is generally achy and tired from their stressful lives. Massage is great for anyone looking to help reduce stress, pharmacy
aches and pains, recover faster from training or injuries.

I am a licensed Massage Therapist (LMT #18718) who has extensive experience working with athletes, repetitive use injuries, injury recovery (such as strained/torn muscles, car accidents, bike race crashes) and those just generally looking to feel better.  My bodywork sessions are a blend of deep tissue, structural integration and swedish(relaxation) massage techniques aimed at working with your body to recover, reduce tension and improve the function of your body.

60min – 75$

90min- 105$

package deals(upfront payment required)

3 sessions – 210$

6 sessions – 400$

I can bill insurance for some individuals if your insurance allows(Either auto accident or health insurance)

Please arrive on time for your appointment, as I schedule so you receive a full 60 min or 90 min of bodywork.

Contact me to schedule!

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Massage therapy is a great tool for athletes looking to recover from training, prescription
injuries and for anyone that is generally achy and tired from their stressful lives. Massage is great for anyone looking to help reduce stress, aches and pains, recover faster from training or injuries.

I am a licensed Massage Therapist (LMT #18718) who has extensive experience working with athletes, repetitive use injuries, injury recovery (such as strained/torn muscles, car accidents, bike race crashes) and those just generally looking to feel better.  My bodywork sessions are a blend of deep tissue, structural integration and swedish(relaxation) massage techniques aimed at working with your body to recover, reduce tension and improve the function of your body.

60min – 75$

90min- 105$

package deals(upfront payment required)

3 sessions – 210$

6 sessions – 400$

I can bill insurance for some individuals if your insurance allows(Either auto accident or health insurance)

Please arrive on time for your appointment, as I schedule so you receive a full 60 min or 90 min of bodywork.

Contact me to schedule!
Massage therapy is a great tool for athletes looking to recover from training, pills injuries and bodies that are generally achy and tired from their active lifestyles.  Not only is it great for athletes looking for the extra sharp edge in their performance, drug
anyone suffering from stress, tension, car accidents, repetitive movements, poor body mechanics(how are you sitting right now?) and many other issues.

I am a licensed Massage Therapist (LMT #18718) with the main focus on working with athletes, repetitive use injuries, injury recovery(such as strained/torn muscles, car accidents, bike race crashes) and those just generally looking to feel better.  My bodywork sessions are a blend of deep tissue, structural integration and swedish(relaxation) massage techniques aimed at working with your body to recover, reduce tension and improve the function of your body.

60min – 75$

90min- 105$

package deals(upfront payment required)

3 sessions – 210$

6 sessions – 400$

I can bill insurance for some individuals if your insurance allows(Either auto accident or health insurance)

Please arrive on time for your appointment, as I schedule so you receive a full 60 min or 90 min of bodywork.

Contact me to schedule!
Its October, here the road season is fully wrapped up(been wrapped up for a while here in Oregon, cystitis
other places in the country such as Cali, its been holding on as tightly as it could through most of September though).  The rain is supposed to start falling here in Portland this weekend, the cyclocross racers are in full swing.

 

So at this point, most racers and even a lot of recreational riders who do not race, are wondering how to best spend their time training right now to adjust to the winter months.  If you are racing cyclocross, you should be in the prime of your yearly interval training.  On the bike, feeling the pain of VO2, threshold, race starts and numerous other workouts.  However, if you are not a cross racer, your training should be very different right now, even recreational riders should be looking at other types of training to be done.

Lets start with what to do on the bike – reduced hours for some people who are able to put in more time in the road season, for example, if you are a racer who is pretty capable and regularly do around 15 hours a week, on your bike, its a good time of year to cut back the total training hours a week around 10-12, and then only putting in around 6-7 on the bike.  If you are strapped for time, balancing work, training, family etc, you may already only be doing 6-7 hours a week of training.  If this is you, your overall hours should stay the same, as much as possible, but like the group who is able to put in more time, your focus should shift somewhat from on the bike training to include more forms of training off the bike.

Your on the bike training should consist mostly of easy rides, trying to keep it to endurance and low tempo paced riding.  Shy away from the harder efforts that are challenging your maximal efforts, 1 min power, or any other very hard experiences on the bike.  Occasionally, its good to toss in a hard ride through the off season, it will keep your training and riding fun, remind you why you are doing some cross training and generally blow out the cobwebs a bit.

Other on the bike training should include cadence and efficiency drills, working on keeping your knees in and not flaring out with every pedal stroke, keeping your heal in the proper place for full extension, keeping elbows bent and in and many other aspects of proper riding form we are not concentrating on the rest of the year.

Off the bike, you should be including some other sports or activities this time of year.  Doing some runs, XC skiing, soccer, or other aerobic activities that take you outside of the normal planes of movement we see everyday in cycling is great.  You want some variety to work weaker muscle groups to help strengthen your joints and improve overall mobility and function of them.  It will also help prevent on the bike injuries down the road by keeping imbalances in check and building up some supporting muscle groups that are important in maintaining overall good health.

This is also the time to include weights.  Strength training is a great way to help improve power on the bike, and the fall/winter is the best time to focus on it.  You should strive for a solid 12-16 week program getting in 2-3 days a week to really reap the benefit before moving into base miles, and through base miles it can be good to keep one day a week in with weights.

There are also many indoor group training sessions available out there(such as the ones I lead at UEF) that are based on an annual training plan and have shape and progress through the class.  Even if it is not a structured class, getting in a group class(maybe not even related to cycling) could be a good way to help motivate you and keep you in shape when other forms of training are not an option and you cant stand another minute in the rain or on the trainer.

Whatever route you go, the one key thing to do is to keep some sort of active routine up through the winter so you keep up some fitness and have fun.  Its also a great way to warm up on cold winter days!

Off Season Training has begun!

I discovered my love for two wheels, viagra sale probably as soon as I was allowed to stray, I still remember that shiny red tricycle!  From there the obsession only got worse, and before long, I was on my bike every day from a young age.  But wait, there are more things that have led to my experiences as a bike racer than life on a tricycle.  My real age as a bike race was started when I was highly involved with music. The bassoon, to be specific. I’m a seventh generation musician, and my grandmother, in her youthful 100’s, still writes pieces for me. My musical background took me from my home state of Oregon to the California Bay Area to attend the San Francisco Conservatory of Music following high school.

While at school in California, I did like everyone else does there and racing. When in Rome, right? Since I didn’t know a thing about bike racing, aside from not being able to race on a tricycle, I joined a local bay area bike club, Peninsula Velo.  What started out as dipping my toes immediately became a head first swan dive.  Immediately I knew that I would have to chase this to my highest potential to see how far I could take it, and how hard I could push myself.  In the process, I have made many great friends, found amazing experiences and places, and have built a wonderful career around the sport.

Eventually I ended up moving to Oregon, after I left the Conservatory and its small confining practice rooms, to attend school at the University of Oregon, where I earned a degree in Economics.  It seems the small room that I was confined in at the conservatory has followed me. This time it has disguised itself as something called a “lab”. Instead of running scales, symphonies and etudes, I did like all good economists and ran regressions. In addition to earning a degree in Economics, I also spent a large part of my time devoted to keeping up on the latest information on training and physiology to supplement my goals as a cyclist.  Since graduating college, I have been I spending my time training and racing, while also building it into a career of coaching riders of all ages and abilities.

I am a coach at Upper Echelon Fitness, and work along side several great coaches and staff. They are a great group to work with to help offer premier coaching in Oregon. In addition to coaching clients of my own, there is a saying that even a coach needs a coach. My coach and mentor has been Clark Natwick. Clark has been a great help and mentor through out my cycling career, helping to shape both myself as an athlete, and my coaching philosophies. I race and help manage a phenomenal elite team at Team Oregon, and we have created a team that has become a top development team in the northwest. In addition to developing riders from new racers to category 1 elite riders, Team Oregon is maintaining one of the best elite teams on the west coast.  Keep an eye out for us at an NRC near you! Without all these guys, I wouldn’t be able to chase my dream of winning professional bike races. Thanks!

Keep checking the site for updates as I relay the trials and tribulations of racing and training across the US in the effort of becoming the best athlete I can be. And thanks for cheering!

chrisswan3
Crashing sucks, youth health
but it is going to happen at one point or another, gonorrhea
whether you are racing or just on a ride, they happen.  At least usually they are not too bad.  Here are some pointers for making the crash a a little bit less painful and injury filled.

While still on the bike, if you are approaching a pile up or see the issue unfolding, look for possible exits.  Concentrate on the holes and gaps between riders and things rather than staring at people falling on the ground.  If you see a small gap between a rider and his bike, steer for that gap and try to squeeze through.  All the while, scrub speed as possible in case you do not make it through.

If you know your going to crash, at least do your best to point into flat areas, its better to crash into a rider on the road and land on pavement rather than pointing to light post on the side of the street.  Most crashes in crits are not too bad, usually just a bit of lost skin.  Aside from flopping poorly on the ground, most major injuries are sustained when a rider crashes into a fixed inanimate object such as light post, parking meter etc. These small hard fixed objects put all the forces of the impact into one small space and stop you suddenly.  Hitting a broader surface and sliding out(as in landing in the middle of the road) is much less devastating.  So if you have any chance to steer around something, point towards open flat areas and away from vertical fixed objects as best you can.

Scrub whatever speed you can, if you have time to slow a bit, losing a few mph while your still on the bike will be preferable to losing that mph while sliding on the ground using your skin as the brakes.  Especially if hitting an object is going to happen.  If you are cornering, hitting the brakes hard is going to cause the wheels to lock up and you will start to slide out.  Come up out of the corner, point the bike a bit straighter and hit the brakes.  Just be cautious what coming out of the corner will be setting you up for going straight into (see the above paragraph…).  Sometimes just going down in the corner will be a better option than crashing into something at the exit of the corner.

So, you have tried losing speed, going around, or the crash was just so sudden you didnt have time to think, you are now flying through the air and about to hit the ground.  Your best bet is to tuck and roll as much as possible.  Tuck your chin into your chest as much as possible, this will help minimize whiplash from hitting things, and help bring your head in so it is not flopping around smacking the pavement.  Especially important if you land on your back.  If you are erect and head out, you are going to smack your head into the pavement, increasing likely hood of concussion or neck injuries.  Keeping your chin tucked in allows you to roll back a bit more rather than having your head hit full force into the pave.

Its counter intuitive, but try to avoid catching yourself with your arms.  If you go down and are falling and put your arm out to catch yourself directly in front of you(like a push up position) this is the motion that will most likely cause a dislocated shoulder, as the humerus will get pushed back out of the socket, or the forces will go into the scapula and cause issues here.  If you put your arm out to the side(such as making a T with your arms out away from your sides) this can contribute to a broken clavicle as your humerus will get pushed up upon falling, leaving all the forces into the collar bone.  Broken wrists/hands/arms are also greatly increased in this position as this puts all the initial impact into one small exposed portion of your body, all the impact goes into the wrist and hand, up the arm and into the shoulder.

Direct hits to the shoulder, especially in downward or down & back impacts will also increase likely hood of breaking the clavicle(collar bone).  Tucking and rolling, aiming to roll onto your back or side, will help decrease the initial impact.

Tucking and rolling helps disperse the impact and smooths it out as you hit the ground, allowing the forces to go get dispersed, making the impacts less on particular points of your body.  You may have a few more sore spots and small bits of road rash in some multiple places, but being a little sore everywhere for a few days is much better than nursing a torn rotator cuff for the next 6 months.

Of course there are times where greater injury is unavoidable, but I know all of my crashes would have been much worse had I not known how to take a fall well.  For learning how to roll well, enroll in a Judo or Aikido class for a few months, these two martial arts involve lots of falls, and learning how to roll and take a fall is a big part of starting them.  You may never encounter thugs and need to use your new found ninja skills to fend off attackers, but if you intend to race bikes, the skills of falling may greatly reduce your chances of serious injury.

If your interested in learning some basics of how to roll, let me know and I would be happy to show you some rolling basics.
Hard to believe it, dosage
but its already October, which means its time for indoor classes at Upper Echelon!  I am currently running my cross training and strength and conditioning classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30-6:30(We often run a few minutes over for stretching and recovery techniques, but people are free to leave, I know its often running into dinner time activities).

We do a range of training through the classes from running drills, agility drills, plyometrics, weights, stability drills, core and stretching.  I keep the program so it is building through the fall, so each class is a little different and continually changing to keep your body progressing and getting stronger while also keeping it interesting.  The training is based around fitness for cycling, focusing on building strength and power you need to ride hard through the season, while also addressing underused muscles and skills so you are more balanced and reduce chances for overuse injuries from sticking to one primary sport or activity through the year.

The training is great for both racers looking to keep fit and build an edge for their next race season, or just for people working for general fitness or cross training with no competition in sight.  The classes are structured in a way that you will be adequately challenged no matter what your level is.

Shoot me a message if you have any questions or sign up here:

http://www.upperechelonfitness.com/training/classes-and-clinics/

Hope to see you in class!